Surviving Means Staying Connected

Over the past few weeks the way fashion industries use social media outlets has been dissected.  From celebrity endorsements to the world’s most renowned designers, a conclusion has been made: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat are the reason audiences feel inspired to purchase your product.  In a world where millennials are taking over, fashion industries are constantly striving to reach audiences of all demographics.  Not only are we able to scroll, text and swipe with the touch of a finger, but we can watch and live stream, too.  Everything is given to us right in the palm of our hands through our electronic devices and social media profiles.

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An Instagram post by @kyliejenner advertising her cosmetics

We live in a world where celebrities are idolized and followed on every social media account possible.  Who knew that “Keeping up with the Kardashians” would not just be a famous reality TV show, but instead literally mean keeping up with Kylie. Millennials want to be the first to comment, repost, favorite and purchase Kylie Jenner’s new makeup line right off of her Instagram photo within seconds of her post.  Social media has given  one of Kylie’s 78.7 million followers on Instagram a whole knew meaning.  Audiences feel connected and involved like never before.  Fifteen years ago, who would have predicted that professional athletes such as Tom Brady and David Beckham would be the faces of UGG and H&M?  We live in a society that loves to watch professional athletes on the field as much as we do on the billboards.  How are long-time, brand-name designers adapting to the social media culture?  A hashtag like “#InstaKors” seems to do the trick.  

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@uggformen is using Tom Brady as the face of their social media accounts

Our century is surviving through the ability to stay connected.  Individuals are a tweet away from the newest trend. This is creating new reputations for the fashion industry and allows them to reach constituent groups with a different outlet, creating a whole new era. 

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#InstaKors

From giving major labels a bigger profile, to starting the careers of some of the world’s most famous models, social media and the use of mobile applications has become the biggest and best marketing strategy for major fashion labels.  This holds especially accurate for designers like Michael Kors who has always been on top of social media, being the first brand to buy an Instagram ad.

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Michael Kors is an active user on Instagram.  Follow is account @michaelkors 

Michael Kors has been actively using Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram in order to give his customers and top followers a sneak peak into his hottest and latest trends.  Living in a world where the public expects instant gratification, Michael Kors shows his customers the full range of looks on his social media accounts closer to when they can actually purchase them.

With 25 million followers in total, across the platforms, Michael Kors is always looking to tell his brands story on the applications his fans are using and loving.  His brand worked with Snapchat’s “Stories” feature to launch Fashion Week runway pictures, backstage shots and front-row pictures.  This was so successful that Kors had a super-social Fashion Week show too, streaming the entire show live on the Internet, asking fans to join a chat during the show using the hashtag #AllAccessKors.  This lead to the Michael Kors franchise dominating the social media rankings as the No. 1 fastest-growing and most engaging brand on Facebook.

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At the end of last year, Michael Kors  debuted “InstaKors,” which lets shoppers make purchases through his Instagram

 

Michael Kors wanted the mix of models for his spring/summer 2017 show to represent diversity.  Backstage, he made his vision come to life by implementing diversity as far as the look of the female models, and their body types.  This is extremely effective in a generation where millions of women struggle with appreciating and accepting their bodies.  The idealized woman in fashion during this decade would need to spend enormous amount of time and energy attempting to achieve something that is not only trivial but also completely unattainable.  With Michael Kors using models of different demographics on his social accounts, he is able to reach a larger target group of customers in the fashion world.

By: Shannon Quinlan

The Social Media Takeover

Worldwide ad revenue for social media networks is forecast to top $50 billion in 2018, which means social media has a bigger impact on corporate communication, advertising and marketing than ever before.  Currently we are living in a society that cares more about the newest updates on social media platforms than it does the presidential debate.

 

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What does your Instagram say about you?

In the social media platform world today, we can use the rising controversy between Instagram and Snapchat as an example. Instagram is a follower platform where Snapchat is more of a best friend platform.  Snapchat hasn’t encouraged brands to build up huge followings.  Heart icons do not exist for people to express their approval on Snapchat, which makes it harder to follow accounts because users have to know exact names and phone numbers to find them and add friends. Instagram makes searching a breeze, and its lets brands buy ads that directly link to their accounts, where people can  follow them within seconds.  These companies benefit largely from using social media.  They are able to gain popularity and promotion as a brand, create a positive image, and receive customer responses.  Marketing segmentation can also help companies become more successful.  If companies can identify certain groups of people or organizations with shared needs and characteristics within the broad markets for consumer products, they can transfer these groups into larger market segments according to their mutual interest in their own products utility.

While we may be too caught up in our devices to know it, our online lifestyles have begun to make a real impact in our offline worlds, a trend that doesn’t seem to be reversing.  Corporate communication, advertising and marketing have influenced these lifestyles repetitively as a cohesive unit.  In 2014, Facebook talked with lenders about the possibility of linking profiles to credit scores, and one recent survey showed that 40 percent of college-admission officers now say they peruse applicants’ social media profiles in addition to evaluating G.P.A.s and essays.  Most millennials are treating social media like the stage for their own reality show.  Social media allows its constituencies to show the best versions of themselves online and in the corporate and advertising communities.  This, in its own way, has provided us a means of generating “other selves”.  We are either oversharing, or under-sharing, and it makes me wonder to what extent our online selves are true to our actual self?  From a corporate communication standpoint, I believe that we are being lead in the direction to use social media as a prism.  This prism projects only what we want others to see.

Social media’s role in corporate communication, advertising, and marketing is something bigger than ourselves.   With manufacturers portraying their brands as different from and better than similar competitive products through advertising, packaging, and physical product differences, different constituent groups are feeling more connected by the hour.

By: Shannon Quinlan